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The Lead

300 Vials Labeled Influenza, Dengue Found at Lab

July 17, 2014 8:26 am | by MATTHEW PERRONE, AP Health Writer | News | Comments

FDA officials said Wednesday the undocumented collection contained 327 carefully packaged vials, listing pathogens like dengue, influenza and rickettsia. Last week the government only disclosed that it had recovered six glass vials of smallpox dating from the 1950s.        

AIDS Research Team in Iowa Loses $1.38M Grant

July 9, 2014 8:27 am | by DAVID PITT, Associated Press | News | Comments

An AIDS research team at Iowa State University will not get the final $1.38 million payment of a...

Forgotten Vials of Smallpox Found in Storage Room

July 8, 2014 2:04 pm | by MIKE STOBBE, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Government workers cleaning out an old storage room at a research center near Washington made a...

NIH Creates Network to Tackle Mysterious Diseases

July 2, 2014 9:44 am | by LAURAN NEERGAARD, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

The government is expanding its "mystery disease" program, funding a network at six universities...

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Unapproved Device Buys Time for New Pair of Lungs

July 2, 2014 9:31 am | by LAURAN NEERGAARD, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Jon Sacker was near death, too sick for doctors to attempt the double lung transplant he so desperately needed. His only chance: An experimental machine that essentially works like dialysis for the lungs. But the device has not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration and there were none in the country.

AIDS Scientist Pleads Not Guilty to Faking Study

July 2, 2014 8:22 am | by DAVID PITT, Associated Press | News | Comments

Dong-Pyou Han, 57, entered his not guilty pleas to four counts of making false statements during his initial court appearance in Des Moines federal court. Each count carries a maximum sentence of five years in prison and a $250,000 fine.  

Marrow Transplants Can Reverse Adult Sickle Cell

July 2, 2014 8:17 am | by LINDSEY TANNER, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Bone marrow transplants can reverse severe sickle cell disease in adults, a small study by government scientists found, echoing results seen with a similar technique used in children. The researchers and others say the findings show age need not be a barrier and that the technique may change practice for some adult patients when standard treatment fails.

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Researcher Charged in Major HIV Vaccine Fraud Case

June 25, 2014 8:29 am | by RYAN J. FOLEY, Associated Press | News | Comments

Responding to a major case of research misconduct, federal prosecutors have taken the rare step of filing charges against a scientist after he admitted falsifying data that led to millions in grants and hopes of a breakthrough in AIDS vaccine research.

Healthy Seniors Tested In Bid to Block Alzheimer's

June 10, 2014 8:44 am | by LAURAN NEERGAARD, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

In one of the most ambitious attempts yet to thwart Alzheimer's disease, a major study got underway Monday to see if an experimental drug can protect healthy seniors whose brains harbor silent signs that they're at risk.     

Execution Drugs Harm Breathing and Heart Function

April 30, 2014 8:56 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Oklahoma changed its execution protocols twice this year. State officials have five options for lethal injections, including a new three-drug mixture that was used for the first time Tuesday.          

DesignMedix Awarded $3M to Develop Low-Cost, Safe Malaria Drug

April 15, 2014 8:00 am | News | Comments

DesignMedix, Inc., a biotech startup with ties to Portland State University, received a grant for almost $3 million from the National Institutes of Health to continue development and manufacture of a new anti-malarial drug.     

Dust Off That Tinfoil Hat: Vaccinations

March 21, 2014 5:23 pm | by Nikita Ernst, Associate Editor | Blogs | Comments

The controversy over vaccinations is back in the spotlight, after a Colorado bill passed tightening the loophole that allows parents to choose not to vaccinate, and actress Kristen Cavalarri spoke out against vaccinations claiming a connection with autism. What's more frightening is the frequency of outbreaks of diseases we thought we'd eradicated. 

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Study of Antibody Evolution Charts Course Toward HIV Vaccine

March 3, 2014 1:59 pm | News | Comments

In an advance for HIV vaccine research, a scientific team has discovered how the immune system makes a powerful antibody that blocks HIV infection of cells by targeting a site on the virus called V1V2.        

Partners in New NIH-Industry Project to Find Meds

February 4, 2014 1:43 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Ten pharmaceutical companies, seven disease-related foundations, the drug industry's main trade group and two huge federal agencies have joined together in an unusual collaboration to share information and speed up creation and approval of new drugs needed by patients.

NIH Director Explains New Drug Partnership

February 4, 2014 8:45 am | Videos | Comments

The National Institutes of Health Director Francis Collins explained a breakthrough venture between private and public entities to find a cure for complex disorders such as diabetes, Alzheimer's Disease, and other illnesses connected to the human genome.

Want to Get the Flu? Volunteers Sneeze for Science

January 27, 2014 8:15 am | by LAURAN NEERGAARD, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Forget being sneezed on: Government scientists are deliberately giving dozens of volunteers the flu by squirting the live virus straight up their noses. It may sound bizarre, but the rare type of research is a step in the quest for better flu vaccines. It turns out that how the body fends off influenza remains something of a mystery.

Study Dispels 'Obesity Paradox' Idea for Diabetics

January 16, 2014 8:49 am | by MARILYNN MARCHIONE, AP Chief Medical Writer | News | Comments

The "obesity paradox" — the controversial notion that being overweight might actually be healthier for some people with diabetes — seems to be a myth, researchers report. A major study finds there's no survival advantage to being large, and a disadvantage to being very large.

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Survey: Teens Using Synthetic Drugs Less Often

December 18, 2013 8:22 am | by ALICIA A. CALDWELL, Associated Press; LAURAN NEERGAARD, Associated Press | News | Comments

Fewer teens are trying fake marijuana known by such names as K2 and Spice, apparently getting the message that these cheap new drugs are highly dangerous, according to the government's annual survey on drug use.      

Obama Reveals $100M HIV Research Initiative

December 3, 2013 8:36 am | by LAURAN NEERGAARD, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

President Barack Obama announced a new initiative at the National Institutes of Health in pursuit of a cure for HIV, saying his administration is redirecting $100 million into the project to find a new generation of therapies.    

NH Hospital Calls Eight Over Brain Disease Chances

September 6, 2013 8:06 am | by HOLLY RAMER, Associated Press | News | Comments

Eight patients who may have been exposed to a fatal brain disease at a New Hampshire hospital have been contacted by the hospital's president, who said the patients aren't panicking. Dr. Joseph Pepe called the Catholic Medical Center patients a day after health officials announced that they may have been exposed to Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease.

Infant DNA to Be Mapped at Birth?

September 5, 2013 8:59 am | Videos | Comments

The National Institutes of Health is launching an initiative to determine whether sequencing an infant's DNA can improve on well-established state-run programs to screen newborns for potential life-threatening conditions.    

Feds, Family Reach Deal on Use of DNA Information

August 9, 2013 8:23 am | by MALCOLM RITTER,AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Some 60 years ago, a doctor in Baltimore removed cancer cells from a poor black patient named Henrietta Lacks without her knowledge or consent. Those cells eventually helped lead to a multitude of medical treatments and lay the groundwork for the multibillion-dollar biotech industry.

NIH to Retire Most Chimps from Medical Research

June 27, 2013 8:26 am | by LAURAN NEERGAARD,AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

The NIH announced Wednesday that it will retire about 310 government-owned chimpanzees from research over the next few years, and keep only 50 others essentially on retainer — available if needed for crucial medical studies that could be performed no other way.

Government Stops Study Seeking To Prevent Type of Stroke

May 13, 2013 8:38 am | by LAURAN NEERGAARD,AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

The government has halted a study testing treatments for a brain condition that can cause strokes after early results suggested invasive therapies were riskier than previously thought. The condition involves a kind of tangle in the brain called an arteriovenous malformation, or AVM. Arteries and veins grow knotted together until eventually some of them burst, causing a bleeding stroke.

Latest HIV Vaccine Doesn't Work; Government Halts study

April 26, 2013 8:29 am | by LAURAN NEERGAARD,AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

The latest bad news in the hunt for an AIDS vaccine: The government halted a large U.S. study on Thursday, saying the experimental shots aren't preventing HIV infection. Nor did the shots reduce the amount of the AIDS virus in the blood when people who'd been vaccinated later became infected, the National Institutes of Health said.

Health Officials Say Preemie Study Didn't Fully Disclose Risks

April 12, 2013 8:00 am | News | Comments

Federal health officials say the parents of premature babies enrolled in a study of oxygen treatment several years ago weren't properly informed of the risks: a kind of blindness or death. Oxygen has been a mainstay of treatment for very premature babies. But too much has long been known to cause a kind of blindness called retinopathy of prematurity, and too little can increase risk of death.

Actinobac Biomed Receives $202,000 from NIH to Advance Blood Cancer Research

March 29, 2013 8:09 am | News | Comments

Actinobac Biomed Inc, originally funded with an investment from Foundation Venture Capital Group, Inc., has received a $202,000 Small Business Technology Transfer Grant (STTR) from the National Institutes of Health to study its drug candidate, Leukothera, as a potential treatment for B-cell lymphomas.

Next-generation CT scanner provides better images with minimal radiation

January 31, 2013 6:21 am | by National Institutes of Health | News | Comments

A new computed tomography (CT) scanner substantially reduces potentially harmful radiation while still improving overall image quality. National Institutes of Health researchers, along with engineers at Toshiba Medical Systems, worked on the scanner. An analysis of data on 107 patients...

NIH study advances understanding of movement control

January 28, 2013 11:21 am | by National Institutes of Health | News | Comments

Voluntary movements involve the coordinated activation of two brain pathways that connect parts of deep brain structures called the basal ganglia, according to a study in mice by researchers at the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), part of the National Institutes...

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